Local military historian Gary Palmer, a retired San Diego Sheriff’s Deputy, Naval aviator, and National Guard tank commander, has released his first book in a new series about the United States Cavalry. The U.S. Cavalry: Time of Transition, 1938–1944—Horses to Mechanization is available on Amazon.com in paperback and Kindle formats.

During the 1930s and into World War II, the U.S. Cavalry wrestled with a fundamental question: should its horses be retired and replaced with tanks and other mechanized vehicles—or should the horse remain the “primary weapon” of the cavalry? Time of Transition is Palmer’s detailed look at this game-changing period for the American military establishment.

Ten years in the making, Time of Transition is Palmer’s tribute to his father, who served in the 106th Cavalry Group during World War II. Blending official wartime records with fresh interviews, stories and rare photos from personal and archival collections, Palmer follows the 106th, a unit of the Illinois National Guard, as its 1,500 personnel transition from horses to vehicles and participate in the landmark Louisiana training maneuvers of 1940–41.

Palmer also uncovers the behind-the-scenes activities of the War Department, Army General Staff, and other military units as they test the firepower of the traditional horse cavalry against the new technologies of tanks, jeeps and other mechanized vehicles.

Time of Transition is the first book in Palmer’s ongoing series about the U.S. Cavalry. The second volume, The U.S. Cavalry: The War Years, June 1944–August 1944—The European Theater, is scheduled for publication in the summer of 2013.

ISBN: 978-0615785837
Softcover, 6” x 9”, 510 pages, $27.00
eBook for Amazon Kindle, $9.99
Published by Voyak Publications, available through Amazon.com

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