Coming to Blu-ray, DVD and digital from director Simon Kaijser and Lionsgate is the story of what happens when what you believe and what is real can cause one to become a “Spinning Man.”

Evan Birch (Guy Pearce) is a philosophy college professor living with wife Ellen (Minnie Driver) and daughter Zelda (Eliza Pryor) and son Adam (Noah Salsbury Lipson). Life is idyllic until a young high school cheerleader goes missing bringing Det. Robert Malloy (Pierce Brosnan) on the case.

Evan goes about his business until there is a knock on his door asking to search his car. Both he and Ellen aren’t sure what is happening or what Evan is being accused of. Reaching out to their family lawyer friend Paul (Clark Gregg), he is asked straight out if there is any chance of involvement.

Upset that anyone would think so, it becomes even more difficult when evidence is found in the car and stories don’t match up. Det. Mallory isn’t making it easy either by planting suspicions in Ellen’s mind. She immediately makes it clear to Evan that she isn’t going to cover for him.

The only light to his days is that of student Anna (Alexandra Shipp) who doesn’t ask much of him other than coffee and talk about his book. As Evan waits for the police to find the missing cheerleader, his mind begins to chase between what is real and the truth.

Both are a matter of life and death.

Pearce as Evan is a man who absolutely has command of the classroom and the subject he is teaching. Living the stereotype of an attractive man professor and yet he is jittery that no one believes in his innocence in all things. Trying to balance his life, his secrets and his persona is what could be his undoing. There is something about Pearce on the screen from “Priscilla Queen of the Desert” to “L.A. Confidential” to “Alien: Covenant” that I know his role is going to be unique and memorable.

Brosnan as Det. Malloy isn’t ruffled in the slightest by anything that Evan says or does. He is one slick policeman when he plants little hints around the wife to get help in solving the case. There are even moments where it is easy to forget he is a cop when in the car with Evan which is, after all, what makes a good cop. Brosnan is still fun to watch and this role gives him grit.

Driver as Ellen is the dutiful wife and stands by her man, even if she’s done it more times that she would like. She also isn’t helping the police much in their investigation but that doesn’t mean she isn’t doing a little home detective work of her own. Driver gives character Evan a little public “what for” shaming and I actually applauded her. It’s good to bend but Driver doesn’t break.

Shipp as Anna is a nice diversion to Evan’s problems and this is certainly the type of student a professor should run from – and run fast! Pryor as Zelda is at that age where parents can be embarrassing and this is just a few steps past the norm. Gregg as lawyer Paul is trying to get his client to stop talking and I suggest superglue to the lips!

Other cast include Jamie Kennedy as Ross, Sean Blakemore as Killian, Jeannie Austin as Barbara, Natasha Bassett as Carrie, Sterling Beaumon as Matt, Patrika Darbo as Kelly, Jennie Fahn as Irene and Odeya Rush as Joyce Bonner.

Lionsgate is a global leader in motion picture production and distribution for theatres, television, home entertainment and more. Theater franchises include “The Hunger Games” and “Divergent,” along with “John Wick.” Now, adding this film to its 16,000 motion picture and television titles you can see everything coming soon as well as available now at http://www.lionsgate.com.

The Blu-ray and digital include the special features of “Deleted Scenes,” “Inside ‘Spinning Man’ Director’s Commentary” and “Trailer Gallery.” “Spinning Man” is based on the book “The Spinning Man” by George Harrar.

“Spinning Man” is a cat and mouse game and most of it is being played by Pearce’s character. All of his antics begin to meld together and that causes him to have problems knowing what the facts are and what is the mind just playing stress tricks. The addition of Brosnan’s character is that of a cop who will let a person hang themselves because he’s got all the time in the world to wait.

Pearce is definitely juggling this character and where it all falls is anybody’s guess – right up until the very last second. That’s what makes a good psychological thriller and this qualifies.

In the end – what you believe and what you know is all in how you spin it!

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About the Author

Jeri Jacquin

Jeri Jacquin covers film, television, DVD/Bluray releases, celebrity interviews, festivals and all things entertainment.